Skip to main content

Lamson Library


Open today:  
(full hours)

Emerging Technology in CJ: Week 10

Week 10: Biometric Identification: Information Sharing

Biometric Identification:

Biometric identification technologies use a particular biological aspect of the human body to recognize or confirm that person’s identity. These technologies can be applied in the criminal justice system to enhance access control and identity verification in correctional facilities, and as an investigative tool for identifying missing and exploited children as well as criminals captured by surveillance systems. Technologies in the research stage, under development, and in use in the field include facial recognition technologies and biometrically enhanced smart cards.

Information Sharing:

Significant efforts are put into the collection of data by the criminal justice community. Data can come in the form of internal departmental memorandums, police arrest and court records, or crime statistics and trends. Data can also come from video cameras and audio recording devices often used in surveillance activities. However, for this information to be fully utilized, there must be a way to convey and analyze the information both internally, within a department, and externally, among agencies. In addition, data obtained from video and audio recordings may require enhancement and analysis to render it useful.

Office of Justice Programs and the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services. (2001). A resource guide to law enforcement, corrections, and forensic technologies (pp. 1-95) (United States, Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs and Office of Community Oriented Policing Services). Washington, DC: COPS: Community Oriented Policing Services.

Readings: Biometric Identification

Required Reading

In the News:

Recommended Reading

Legal Case

Readings: Information Sharing

Required Reading

Watch the "Nova: The Spy Factory" episode (right sidebar) before reading the Stein article.  There is no reading worksheet for this topic, but watch the video and pay special attention while reading the Stein article.

In the News:

Recommended Reading

 

Week 10: Videos