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First Year Seminar and Critical Thinking

Unit #1: Credibility

1: CredibilityConvincing arguments need to be supported by credible evidence.

Bennett, C.  (2010). Credibility [Online image].  Retrieved May 17, 2017 from http://claybennett.co/images/archivetoons/credibility.jpg [Used by permission.]

After completing this page, you should be able to:

Explain

  • Why the credibility of your information sources is essential
  • What it means that “Authority is Constructed and Contextual”
  • What constitutes plagiarism and why it is unacceptable
  • The importance and the uses of a bibliography

Find

  • The library websites for "Guided Search" arranged by subject
  • The A-Z Database List on the library website

Identify

  • The correct citation style for your major or subject interest

Format

  • A bibliographic entry for an encyclopedia article

Complete Assignments

  • Pre-Class Worksheet
  • Goblin Threat
  • Writing assignment #1

Complete this worksheet before class:

1. Library Home Page Overview

2. Video: "Research 101: Authority is Constructed and Contextual."

Eisen, A. (2014, June 13). Research 101: Credibility is contextual [Video file]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/iRlHmK8drWc

About Bibliographies

4. How to Cite an Encyclopedia Entry

Citation Tool

Class Outline

Research/Writing Class Outline

1.  Library Home Page / Subject Guides

2.  Video: "Research 101: Authority is Constructed and Contextual."

3.  What is a Bibliography?

4. How to Cite an Encyclopedia Entry

5.  Worksheet: "Authority is Constructed and Contextual"

6.  Plagiarism

7.  Review "Writing Assignment #1."

 

5. In-Class Worksheet: "Authority is Constructed and Contextual"

Who?  Why?  Process?

Authority Is Constructed and Contextual

Information resources reflect their creators’ expertise and credibility, and are evaluated based on the information need and the context in which the information will be used. Authority is constructed in that various communities may recognize different types of authority. It is contextual in that the information need may help to determine the level of authority required.

Association of College and Research Libraries. (2016, January 11). Framework for information literacy for higher education. Retrieved http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/issues/infolit/Framework_ILHE.pdf

7. Plagiarism

About Plagiarism

Broussard, M., & Oberlin, J. U. (2016). Goblin threat. Retrieved July 29, 2016, from http://www.lycoming.edu/library/instruction/tutorials/plagiarismGame.aspx

8. Background Information: Subject Encyclopedias

Examples:
Using the Bibliography

Note that the bibliography for the Empathy article contains a citation for this book which is available in the library:

Kohn, A. (1990). The brighter side of human nature: Altruism and empathy in everyday life. New York: Basic Books.

Note that the bibliography for the Equal Pay Act of 1963 article contains a citation for this book which is available in the library:

Becker, Susan D. The Origins of the Equal Rights Amendment: American Feminism Between the Wars. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1981.